Why I write this blog

I started this blog back in 2010. I had been living in Seoul for a few years and was spending my free time watching Kdramas. I started off with the modern romance dramas – I didn’t feel guilty spending so much time in front of the TV since I was ‘studying Korean’. 😉

Then, while I was watching them all these questions started popping up such as ‘why are people eating big chunks of tofu when they come out of prison?‘. When I started watching sageuk historical dramas too, well, the list of questions just got longer! So I had to try to find the answers. I started asking my Korean in-laws or my adult students, or searched through books or the Internet. And after spending time looking for answers, it seemed a waste to just keep it all to myself.

dongyi1It’s interesting what a drama on TV can make you do, isn’t it? Before, I wasn’t particularly interested in British history or any other kind of history for that matter. So I never thought I would one day be spending hours searching on the Korean search engine Naver trying to work out of if the royal court of Joseon really did have a female investigation bureau in the 17th century!  That’s what happened after I watched Dong Yi (MBC 2010) the story of King Sukiong’s concubine Dong Yi who (in the drama) was also a detective. There’s plenty of room for artistic licence in historical dramas so it can be a puzzle trying to figure out what is historically correct and what is ‘creativity’. But that’s one of the fascinating things about sageuk dramas. And I like to see how the same king can be portrayed in different ways in different dramas through various actors and storylines.

So these days the main aim of my blog is to write about historical dramas set in Joseon and anything linked to the Joseon period – visits to royal tombs such as King Sukjong and Jang Hee Bin’s tombs or Confucian ceremonies such as Jongmyo Daeje (종묘대제 The annual Memorial Day Service for all the Joseon Kings). Occasionally, I post about my calligraphy classes too. Calligraphy is kind of Joseony, isn’t it?

Sometimes, though, I put up posts that I don’t think have anything directly to do with Joseon but more about modern life in Korea. I’m becoming quite the foodie as I hit my adjumma years. (I was going to say middle age but couldn’t quite get the words out :( ) And I love going out for dinner especially since in Seoul there are so many great (and cheap) Korean restaurants. And when I see the delicious looking food in my photos, I just want to share them with somebody!

7 thoughts on “Why I write this blog

  • October 5, 2014 at 9:53 pm
    Permalink

    Please help me understand. I’m watching the Night Watchman which King Hae Jong became evil. I can’t search the life of this king because I can’t find King Hae Jong even in Wikipedia. Thanking you in advance for helping me.

    Reply
  • January 4, 2015 at 2:38 am
    Permalink

    It must be majestic in its own way living in Seoul! I wish i could fall with a parachute over there and stay like until i leave my final breath, but pocket seems to argue with me. Definitely, I will be keeping an eye on your site for sure! Keep up the good work. :)

    Reply
  • March 28, 2015 at 12:34 pm
    Permalink

    Hi – is there a way to contact you directly? I am coming to Korea April 23-May 1. My father was the first commander of the U.S. Fighter Wing that is stationed at Kunsan and they are renaming part of the base in his honor. I am thrilled beyond belief because I’ve been a dedicated K-drama and k-pop and Korean history aficionado for two years now and am looking for a guide for five days. I don’t even know where or how to begin asking. I am a professional woman, museum director, published author and artist and would like to connect with a mature, knowledgeable guide (who also likes to have fun). Can you point me in the right direction? I’d be so grateful. Thank you, Christina Olds

    Reply
  • April 1, 2015 at 12:29 pm
    Permalink

    I wanted to ask about tea shops in Seoul. there’s a post here about the tea museum (also a tea shop) but I suspect a more traditional / conventional shop is what I’d be looking for, a place to stock up on unusual teas (not green) at normal market prices. anything come to mind? it’s not really enough time for a post but I’ll be in Seoul next week. it’s not completely relevant but some background is that I’m a tea blogger living in Bangkok, so I could pass back some information about what turns up one way or another.

    Reply
    • April 5, 2015 at 10:22 pm
      Permalink

      Hi. I’ve been meaning to do more posts on tea in Korea but haven’t got around to it yet…
      The only tea I’ve had from tea plants here is green tea from Boseong in the south of Korea. I think the best bet for finding unusual teas in a traditional setting is to look around the shops in Insadong. They sell various teas such as jujube tea and chrysanthemum tea, and ginseng. I’m not sure if that is the kind of ‘tea’ you’d be looking for though. Of course the department stores have nice tea sections too.

      Coffee has been much more popular here than tea but recently some ‘upmarket’ teashops have been opening – O’Sulloc is a tea shop chain that sells all sorts of teas (but with an emphasis on green tea). Sorry I can’t be more help.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: